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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN 5
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English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
that has something to doith iran and something else to do with the u.n. nuclear watchdog group called the iaea. just for some context here earlier this week we told you members of the iaea, which is the nuclear watchdog group for the u.n., getting their e-mails and information hacked. all signs pointed that iran was behind that. we also reported to you yesterday that the associated press has a diagram from supposedly inside iran that showed iran wanting to develop a nuclear weapon that would be three times as powerful as hiroshima. today what we're getting crossing on the wires right now the united states effectively set a march deadline for iran to start cooperating with the iaea and let the inspectors into the country for full access. the united states diplomat says if they do not do this, if iran does not start cooperating they are going to recommend that the u.n. security council take this up. now what that means and whether or not that is a credible threat to get iran to start working with this group is a big question. time will only tell. the timeline is of the utmost importance
today's meeting? former u.n. ambassador john bolton joins us. good evening, sir. your thoughts about today's meeting with ambassador rice on capitol hill. >> well, from susan rice's point of view this meeting was a disaster, an opportunity to try to draw the sting out of the opposition that had been expressed by senator mccain and the others. obviously went in the opposite direction, when you have all three of the senators who participated in the meeting coming out after and saying they have more questions now than they did before. this was a bad meeting. no doubt about it. and i think part of the problem here is the -- is the continued focus by the white house, by susan rice, by people looking at it on these so-called talking points that somebody provided to her. i'll just put it this way based on my own experience in government. nobody who's truly competent rinsereads talking points for ay purpose. if you're good enough to be an official, you don't make up words. you follow policy asset by the president, but the notion you can be a cabinet-level official and be given talking points
that we might see tpulg those spots, chris? >> the most interesting one, i guess, is susan rice,s u.n. ambassador was considered one of the frontrunners to be the secretary of state, very popular with president, has enormous regard for her: she was one of his top policy advisers during hit 2008 campaign. this is susan rice that did the five sunday shows a few days after the libya attack in which she put out the story, apparently they claim still these were the cia talking points that this was all a spontaneous protest over the video that went bad, but there's been a lot of contradiction of that. i think she'd have a tough time getting confirmed. she might get confirmed but it would be a real battle and the president has to decide whether he wants to have that battle. somebody else that is clear is desperate for the job is massachusetts senator john kerry who of course played mitt romney in the debate. one of the questions there, i think he would sale through the senate club, on the other hand i'm not so sure that they want to lose a senate seat. they may feel with all the pick ups th
to susan rice, as a nominee? >> i am always in favor of u.n. ambassadors making something of themselves when they finish at the u.n. if the president wants to have a fight he thinks he can win, he can get a fight with susan rice. let's be crass about this. i think the president thinks he's on a roll. i think he thinks republicans are going to fold like a cheap suit on taxes and entitlements. i think ultimately he thinks they will fold on susan rice, too. my guess is, he nominates her. he thinks he is going to win and he emerges stronger. if republicans want to take a position on susan rice, they better be prepared to think through the implication and not hand the president a victory he doesn't deserve. >> thank you, sir. >> thank you. senator john thune is here and joining us. >> good evening, greta. >> have you seen anything to indicate we are close to a resolution or moving in that direction? >> i haven't. it's hard to come to a resolution when one of the parties is not around. the president is on the campaign trail again -- >> you are referring to his trip on friday to pennsylvania?
susan rice to the foreign relations committee in the senate when she was first nominated to be the u.n. ambassador. so clearly i want her to be successful. i was proud of her. and yet i left that meeting with less of a feeling with about her judgment and about her suitability to be secretary of state. >> now, kelly, much has been made of this. and i think some of it rightly so, susan collins is not a conservative republican. is this -- is this just, again, posturi posturing? because susan collins, what you don't hear susan collins saying if nominated i will vote against her. you've heard few say that. what is this? is it real opposition there with susan rice, or is it kind of talking a warning sign to maybe get more on benghazi if nominated? >> reporter: i do think the leverage to get more on benghazi is a real thing here. i find from senators, they take so seriously the role of advise and consent for nominees that they try to be very careful about not throwing around the i won't vote for until there are hearings, until there's a nomination. they believe in the process. you pointed out
fearlessly stood up to the drug cartels found murdered. >>> and face-to-face behind closed doors today, u.n. ambassador susan rice takes on one of her sharpest critics, senator john mccain, over her actions after the benghazi attack. good morning and welcome to "early start," i'm deborah feyerick in for john berman. >> really nice to have you. >> i'm so glad to be here. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. it's 5:00 a.m. in the east. first, congress back to work, and back to bickering. in just under 35 days, america hits the fiscal cliff. that triggers severe spending cuts and tax hikes. several top republicans are now defying party politics and signaling a willingness to consider increasing tax revenues to get a budget deal done. but when the lame duck senate got back in session yesterday it sure sounded like the same old broken record. >> the senate has spoken. president obama has spoken. he's promising he will not sign any bill that mortgages our future to pay for handouts to the wealthiest 2% of americans. i only hope house republicans have been listening. >> we've been responsible, even as we've r
to war without a declaration by congress but accepting international authority from the u.n. or nato or even for preemptive wars, otherwise known as aggression. a financial political crisis as a -- number four, a financial political crisis as a consequence of excessive debt, unfunded liabilities, spending, bailouts and gross discrepancy in gross dispribution go from the mill class to the rich. the danger of central economic planning by the federal reserve must be understood. world government taking over local and u.s. sompt by getting involved in the -- sovereignty by getting involved in the issues of war, welfare, banking, taxes, property, ownership and private -- private ownership of guns must be addressed. happily, there's an answer for these very dangerous trends. what a wonderful world it would be if we accepted the moral premise of act of aggression. a suggestion is always too simplistic, utopian, dangerous and unrealistic to strive for such an ideal. the answer to that is after thousands of years, the acceptance of government force to rule over the people at the sacrifice of l
mccain is softening his attacks on u.n. ambassador susan rice after vowing to block her potential nomination as secretary of state. republicans claim ambassador rice deliberately misled the country in the aftermath of the september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. but rice says that she's not to blame, arguing she relied on the talking points from the intelligence community. although mccain had threatened a senate filibuster earlier this month, he's now open to meeting directly with miss rice. >> is there anything that ambassador rice can do to change your mind about it? >> sure. she can -- i give everyone the benefit of explaining their position and the actions that they took. and i'll be glad to have the opportunity to discuss these issues with her. >> she could conceivably get your vote for secretary of state? >> i think she deserves the ability and the opportunity to explain herself and her position. >> the white house says no decisions have been made as far as cabinet selections for the president's second term. and john heilemann, part of what you wrote about th
. host: here is an interesting article. if all or on twitter says, what about the u.n. watchers that have been followed with threats of arrest? who are they and what are they here? -- why are they here? guest: they have come to elections in the last 20 years and moderate them. to be clear in terms of what they actually do the polls now, they are not trying to intervene in anything that is going on. they are observers. they are watching what is happening. they are taking notes. i actually got to see their observer form on saturday. at the end of the election, they come up with a report to talk about how the election went, how the system operated. it is something that happens all over the world. my view, it is really bad form for the attorney-general from texas, and also the secretary of state from iowa, who basically say we will arrest these observers as they come out and see our with elections. the truth of the matter is, we should be transparent about this process and willing to let people see how our elections run. host: from fox news, greta van susteren said, the election is none of th
explained. un best issloloathes structured time, and he let his aides know that spending a day in a hotel room awaiting results was unacceptable. the mood all there was resolute ly relax and playful. the campaign's chief strategist wandered to the back of the plane to shoot reporters with a gun." -- with a nerf joyce, oregon, on our republican line. give us your take on yesterday's election. caller: good morning. i hope i can fully say all that i feel this morning. funeral, so my emotions are kind of up. i just want to said that obama has a beautiful family. he is our leader, and god tells us to pray for our leaders. this is real important. my prayer is that the whole -- the whole nation's prayer is that obama will lead with that obama will lead with integrity
. secretary of state hillary clinton will also transition out. u.n. ambassador susan rice was seen as likely replacement that could be in jeopardy given her public involvement in the very controversial benghazi situation. but also looking at that position, senator kerri. seen as potential contender for secretary of state slot, jenna. jenna: you mentioned burnout some of the personal reasons folks don't stay two terms. what are the key decisions that will impact the decisions? >> i mentioned fiscal cliff with that coming, issues about sequestration. defense secretary leon panetta has been very vocal about the fears of the impact on the pentagon. he has been very involved in the negotiations. we talked to a professor from to us son state university. she said when people are invested in the negotiations they don't like to walk away. that is probably true of secretary panetta. here is what she told us. >> defense secretary leon panetta, he has fought hard against sequestration because he didn't want to see the type of cuts that sequestration called for the defense department. and he is going to
it was reported that the administration voted in the un to fast track an arms treaty that reaches all the way to private sales of small fire arms. >> a global arms treaty. >> steve: this is what dick morrison warned us about. and how do the founders feel about that? >> i think it is clear that the founders did not give the president treaty power to trump individual rights guaranteed by the bill of rights >> chris: check it out. it is a fascinating new book. it is call would the naked constitution, are there president. >> lost his attention. thank you. wine and booze. a dry spell looming when people might need a drink . >> steve: it is friday. heroes who are not stopping being herose . good morning guys, you are next on "fox and friends". ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] i found the best cafe in the world. ♪ nespresso. where there's a coffee to match my every mood. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect cup. where every cappuccino and latte is made with fresh milk. ♪ and where clothing is optional. nespresso. what else? has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure d
that you have millions of people un document. if you move people out of that status, that will have a positive benefit not just to people, but to wages being depressed. equity is a critical issue. we face a significant challenge -- in the short-term, medium- term, and long term, there is so much inequity in education. it is not something that the political process likes to discuss, but it is one in which we need to think more creatively about how -- ideas not good for our -- it is not good for us in the medium or long-term. >> nice to go last on this because i can think. [laughter] a really high-quality pre-k -- >> i agree. >> education for kids at the bottom of the income scale. this is supported by conservatives and liberals alike. a nobel-laureate economist to i think is associated with republicans has written eloquently about how critically important -- and there has got to be a significant government will pick it will not happen withou -- significant government role. it will not happen without. and this is of be, but full employment. during my lifetime, the only time i've seen
grover norquist. this man is an un-elected person who is making you sign a pledge that has nothing to do with -- with the country. guest: thank you. respectfully disagree on all accounts. especially at the very beginning. you made the case that we are talking about 47%. the fact is, republicans are not. democrats are raising this issue over and over. they see political advantage in it, but one of our frustrations as republicans with that 47% is that many of them don't have the good-paying type of jobs they want that would allow them to be taxpayers. our frustration is that we have an economy that is flying so low and so slow it's very weak. we have so many people unemployed. so many people on food stamps. so many people who don't have a choice they have to rely on the government. we want that 47% to be reduced by stronger economic growth. we want those who begin in the lower classes of income to become middle tax taxpayers. and to rise to higher levels as well. that's our frustration. host: congressman braidy, we have been talking about this fiscal cliff that congress is grappling with a
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)